Photo 21 Sep 993 notes bookdrunkdemigod:

I just really love books. And flowers. Flowers are good too. But books.

bookdrunkdemigod:

I just really love books. And flowers. Flowers are good too. But books.

Video 21 Sep 1,438 notes

"Fear can make companions of us all."

(Source: rollo.co.vu)

Photo 21 Sep 611 notes utcjonesobservatory:

Mars: Victoria Crater
"Victoria Crater," about 800 meters (one-half mile) in diameter, has been home ground for NASA’s Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity for more 14 of the rover’s first 46 months on Mars. This view shows the rover’s path overlaid on an image of the crater taken by the High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment on NASA’s Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter. Opportunity first reached the crater’s rim on Sept. 27, 2006, during the 951st Martian day, or sol, of the rover’s work in the Meridian Planum region of Mars. The rover then explored clockwise about one-fourth of the way around the rim before returning to a point close to its first overlook. On the mission’s 1,293rd sol (Sept. 13, 2007), Opportunity began a sustained exploration of the interior of the crater, entering at an alcove called "Duck Bay" on the western side of Victoria. This traverse map includes Opportunity’s route though Sol 1,365 (Nov. 26, 2007). The scale bar is 300 meters (984 feet) long. Caption: NASA/JPL

utcjonesobservatory:

Mars: Victoria Crater

"Victoria Crater," about 800 meters (one-half mile) in diameter, has been home ground for NASA’s Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity for more 14 of the rover’s first 46 months on Mars. This view shows the rover’s path overlaid on an image of the crater taken by the High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment on NASA’s Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter. Opportunity first reached the crater’s rim on Sept. 27, 2006, during the 951st Martian day, or sol, of the rover’s work in the Meridian Planum region of Mars. The rover then explored clockwise about one-fourth of the way around the rim before returning to a point close to its first overlook. On the mission’s 1,293rd sol (Sept. 13, 2007), Opportunity began a sustained exploration of the interior of the crater, entering at an alcove called "Duck Bay" on the western side of Victoria. This traverse map includes Opportunity’s route though Sol 1,365 (Nov. 26, 2007). The scale bar is 300 meters (984 feet) long.
 Caption: NASA/JPL

via NASA.
Photo 21 Sep 66 notes thenewenlightenmentage:

Special relativity aces time trial
'Time dilation' predicted by Einstein confirmed by lithium ion experiment.
Physicists have verified a key prediction of Albert Einstein’s special theory of relativity with unprecedented accuracy. Experiments at a particle accelerator in Germany confirm that time moves slower for a moving clock than for a stationary one.
The work is the most stringent test yet of this ‘time-dilation’ effect, which Einstein predicted. One of the consequences of this effect is that a person travelling in a high-speed rocket would age more slowly than people back on Earth.
Continue Reading

thenewenlightenmentage:

Special relativity aces time trial

'Time dilation' predicted by Einstein confirmed by lithium ion experiment.

Physicists have verified a key prediction of Albert Einstein’s special theory of relativity with unprecedented accuracy. Experiments at a particle accelerator in Germany confirm that time moves slower for a moving clock than for a stationary one.

The work is the most stringent test yet of this ‘time-dilation’ effect, which Einstein predicted. One of the consequences of this effect is that a person travelling in a high-speed rocket would age more slowly than people back on Earth.

Continue Reading

Photo 21 Sep 155 notes distant-traveller:

Shoreline of the universe

Against dark rifts of interstellar dust, the ebb and flow of starlight along the Milky Way looks like waves breaking on a cosmic shore in this night skyscape. Taken with a digital camera from the dunes of Hatteras Island, North Carolina, planet Earth, the monochrome image is reminiscent of the time when sensitive black and white film was a popular choice for dimly lit night- and astro-photography. Looking south, the bright stars of Sagittarius and Scorpius are near the center of the frame. Wandering Mars, Saturn, and Zubenelgenubi (Alpha Librae) form the compact triangle of bright celestial beacons farther right of the galaxy’s central bulge. Of course, the evocative black and white beach scene could also be from that vintage 1950s scifi movie you never saw, “It Came From Beyond the Dunes.”

Image credit & copyright: Bill Dickinson

distant-traveller:

Shoreline of the universe

Against dark rifts of interstellar dust, the ebb and flow of starlight along the Milky Way looks like waves breaking on a cosmic shore in this night skyscape. Taken with a digital camera from the dunes of Hatteras Island, North Carolina, planet Earth, the monochrome image is reminiscent of the time when sensitive black and white film was a popular choice for dimly lit night- and astro-photography. Looking south, the bright stars of Sagittarius and Scorpius are near the center of the frame. Wandering Mars, Saturn, and Zubenelgenubi (Alpha Librae) form the compact triangle of bright celestial beacons farther right of the galaxy’s central bulge. Of course, the evocative black and white beach scene could also be from that vintage 1950s scifi movie you never saw, “It Came From Beyond the Dunes.”

Image credit & copyright: Bill Dickinson

Photo 21 Sep 388 notes immortal-autumn:

Autumn is among us on We Heart It.

immortal-autumn:

Autumn is among us on We Heart It.

via Inhabitude.
Quote 21 Sep 1,257 notes

You cannot compare this present experience with a past experience. You can only compare it with a memory of the past, which is a part of the present experience. When you see clearly that memory is a form of present experience, it will be obvious that trying to separate yourself from this experience is as impossible as trying to make your teeth bite themselves.

[…]

To understand this is to realize that life is entirely momentary, that there is neither permanence nor security, and that there is no “I” which can be protected.

— Timeless wisdom on happiness from Alan Watts, who would’ve been 99 today. (via we-are-star-stuff)

(Source: )

Photo 21 Sep 81 notes geozoic:

Visible Paleo Earth https://sites.google.com/a/upr.edu/planetary-habitability-laboratory-upra/projects/visual-paleo-earth/vpe-image-set-1c
Quote 21 Sep 153 notes
What is history? An echo of the past in the future; a reflex from the future on the past.
— Victor Hugo (via inthenoosphere)
Video 21 Sep 3,783 notes

s-c-i-guy:

600 Million Years and Counting…

I was pretty bored so I decided to make some GIFs of the last 600 million years of our planet’s plate tectonics.

The first GIF is a global mollewide projection. The second one is of the Colorado Plateau and the North American Southwest. The next GIF is of the entire formation of the North American Continent. The fourth GIF is of geologic and tectonic evolution of Europe. And finally the last one is the same as the first except in rectangular format.

I obtained the images from Global Paleogeography and them compiled them one by one into Photoshop with the end result being the above GIFs.

Geology rocks


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