Photo 30 Sep 1,630 notes

(Source: you-are-another-me)

via Inhabitude.
Video 30 Sep 177 notes

kateoplis:

"Earth has lost a lot of animals over the past four decades. A major new study by the World Wildlife Fund estimates that the overall number of mammals, birds, reptiles, amphibians and fish has declined 52 percent between 1970 and 2010.

The main culprits? Humans, who have been wiping out other animals through hunting, fishing, deforestation, pollution, and various forms of habitat destruction.”

We’ve wiped out half the world’s wildlife since 1970

via kateoplis.
Photo 30 Sep 169 notes distant-traveller:

A full circle rainbow over Australia

Have you ever seen an entire rainbow? From the ground, typically, only the top portion of a rainbow is visible because directions toward the ground have fewer raindrops. From the air, though, the entire 360 degree circle of a rainbow is more commonly visible. Pictured here, a full circle rainbow was captured over Cottesloe Beach near Perth, Australia last year by a helicopter flying between a setting sun and a downpour. An observer-dependent phenomenon primarily caused by the internal reflection of sunlight by raindrops, the 84-degree diameter rainbow followed the helicopter, intact, for about 5 kilometers. As a bonus, a second rainbow that was more faint and color-reversed was visible outside the first.

Image credit & copyright: Colin Leonhardt (Birdseye View Photography)

distant-traveller:

A full circle rainbow over Australia

Have you ever seen an entire rainbow? From the ground, typically, only the top portion of a rainbow is visible because directions toward the ground have fewer raindrops. From the air, though, the entire 360 degree circle of a rainbow is more commonly visible. Pictured here, a full circle rainbow was captured over Cottesloe Beach near Perth, Australia last year by a helicopter flying between a setting sun and a downpour. An observer-dependent phenomenon primarily caused by the internal reflection of sunlight by raindrops, the 84-degree diameter rainbow followed the helicopter, intact, for about 5 kilometers. As a bonus, a second rainbow that was more faint and color-reversed was visible outside the first.

Image credit & copyright: Colin Leonhardt (Birdseye View Photography)

Photo 30 Sep 9,653 notes nevver:

Staring at the Sun, [to scale]

Yelp, we’re the teeny marble. Now do you have your perspective on straight?

nevver:

Staring at the Sun, [to scale]

Yelp, we’re the teeny marble. Now do you have your perspective on straight?

Photo 30 Sep 242 notes distant-traveller:

Unusual rocks near Pahrump Hills on Mars

How did these Martian rocks form? As the robotic Curiosity rover has approached Pahrump Hills on Mars, it has seen an interesting and textured landscape dotted by some unusual rocks. The featured image shows a curiously round rock spanning about two centimeters across. Seemingly a larger version of numerous spherules dubbed blueberries found by the Opportunity rover on Mars in 2004, what caused this roundness remains unknown. Possibilities include frequent tumbling in flowing water, sprayed molten rock in a volcanic eruption, or a concretion mechanism. The inset image, taken a few days later, shows another small but unusually shaped rock structure. As Curiosity rolls around and up Mount Sharp, different layers of the landscape will be imaged and studied to better understand the ancient history of the region and to investigate whether Mars could once have harbored life.

Image credit: NASA, JPL-Caltech, MSSS

distant-traveller:

Unusual rocks near Pahrump Hills on Mars

How did these Martian rocks form? As the robotic Curiosity rover has approached Pahrump Hills on Mars, it has seen an interesting and textured landscape dotted by some unusual rocks. The featured image shows a curiously round rock spanning about two centimeters across. Seemingly a larger version of numerous spherules dubbed blueberries found by the Opportunity rover on Mars in 2004, what caused this roundness remains unknown. Possibilities include frequent tumbling in flowing water, sprayed molten rock in a volcanic eruption, or a concretion mechanism. The inset image, taken a few days later, shows another small but unusually shaped rock structure. As Curiosity rolls around and up Mount Sharp, different layers of the landscape will be imaged and studied to better understand the ancient history of the region and to investigate whether Mars could once have harbored life.

Image credit: NASA, JPL-Caltech, MSSS

Photo 30 Sep 18,610 notes unamusedsloth:

How koalas run

unamusedsloth:

How koalas run

Photo 30 Sep 1,802 notes dreamtravelspots:

The Blue Pools - Queenstown, New Zealand by Big Frank
via Wild Earth.
Photo 30 Sep 1,560 notes sdzoo:

Introducing the King of the San Diego Zoo, the regal M’bari.

sdzoo:

Introducing the King of the San Diego Zoo, the regal M’bari.

via Wild Earth.
Video 30 Sep 17 notes

scientiflix:

Cloudy climate change: How clouds affect Earth’s temperature

As the Earth’s surface temperature gradually rises, it has become vital for us to predict the rate of this increase with as much precision as possible. In order to do that, scientists need to understand more about aerosols and clouds. Jasper Kirkby details an experiment at CERN that aims to do just that.

View full lesson: http://ed.ted.com/lessons/cloudy-climate-change-how-clouds-affect-earth-s-temperature-jasper-kirkby

Lesson by Jasper Kirkby, animation by Cedric Richer.

Uploaded by: TED-Ed.

Text 30 Sep 9 notes <a href=”http://spaceexp.tumblr.com/tagged/china”>China</a> launches another secretive Shijian-11 mission

spaceexp:

The Chinese have orbited a new satellite from the Jiuquan Satellite Launch Center on Sunday. Utilizing their Long March 2C (Chang Zheng 2C) launch vehicle, the mission involved…


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